Karen Dennison

Poet and artist

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ornith-ology has landed..

ornith-ology the poetry of birds is a celebratory anthology produced by Poetry Wivenhoe in association with Mosaic and I was delighted to be asked to design the cover and put the book together. It was a pleasure working with Pam Job (Poetry Wivenhoe) and Judith Wolton (Mosaic).

It was edited by Tim Cunningham, a poet who divides his time between Essex and Ireland and who has published six poetry collections. Tim selected thirty poems submitted by poets from the two groups. Also included are several illustrations from artists practising locally (Richard Allen, Charlotte Bernays, Sheena Clover, Karen Dennison and Janie Grote).


“This delightful anthology has something for everyone who loves birds and language. Not deliberately thematic, it looks at identifying features, habitats, feeding habits, migration, birds free and ‘pets’, environment, folklore and anecdotes, even romance. Essentially, it is a celebration of how ubiquitous birds enhance our lives. Open any page and you will hear birdsong and a flutter of feathers.” Tim Cunningham

Copies will be available at £7 at the official launch at Poetry Wivenhoe on Thursday 24th November 2016 when the editor will be talking about the process of editing the anthology and will be reading some of his own poems. Also available from Pam Job pamjob@tiscali.co.uk.



Scene noir and old flames

This is the third time that Elly Nobbs and I have given each other images to respond to. It’s a great way to inspire new writing.


Photograph by Karen Dennison

Scene Noir — The Protector

The shadow by my elbow
says, Never mind. A gun hides
under wrapping paper.

It’s up to me to use,
thus saving
all the other party goers.

They have no clue.
I grip the thing, contemplate
its heaviness; hide

it behind, in the waistband
of my jeans like the FBI
agents do on Netflix.

Resigned that the plot calls
for this protagonist
to shoot her mouth off, roaring

Let’s be done with it!

E.E. Nobbs

Edwin Edwards's Old Barn 1978

Photo by Elly Nobbs (Kodak Instamatic 1978)



I asked Elly about the story behind this photo. In the 1960s her parents bought the adjoining small farm which had belonged to an ancient brother and sister. The barn was full of stuff of all sorts – old magazines etc…nothing ever thrown out. As it was gradually falling down it became dangerous so in 1978 Elly’s parents had the Fire Department come and burn down the barn.



Old Flames

He piled up her letters to him,
together with photographs, favourite novels,
diaries he’d penned, poured on lighter fluid.

How she and he melted in Rome and Paris,
fluttered like moths into the night, flames twisting
into ghosts, exorcised as smoke; words re-written as ash,
while the crackling edifice collapsed.

Years later, loss hits him like sunlight
through magnifying glass
onto the crumpled sheets of paper
where he’s written his heart.

What he would give to go back,
unstrike the match, save one photo,
frame the face he can no longer picture.

Karen Dennison

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That Christmas

Here’s an old poem of mine from Counting Rain.

That Christmas

no-one died suddenly
except on the kitchen table in Operation,
except in Cluedo – Miss Scarlet, in the ballroom,
with a rope. And no-one cried uncontrollably
except with laughter. And no-one counted
the seconds on the moon-faced clock
except to wonder what morning would hold.

That Christmas the fireplace outshone the sun,
the tree-lights were Jupiter, Cassiopeia, the Plough,
and our lives were streets of inviolate snow.

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Sally Douglas reviews blueshift: Art from Poetry – Poetry from Art

The Poetry Shed

blueshift: Art from Poetry – Poetry from Art, edited by Karen Dennison

blueshift is a beautiful little pamphlet consisting of a sequence of fifteen pieces of artwork and poetry, each by different writers and artists, and each responding to the one before: a chain reaction of visual and textual imagery which is a delight to experience.
The poems and the artworks are all very different, each a free and often tangential response to the previous work, and this is part of what makes the reading of this book such an exciting experience. However, even when the relationships are quite oblique, there is always a linking thread, like a strong but very fine wire, glinting from under the surface of the text.

The first poem in the collection, Rebecca Gethin’s ‘Wolf Moon’ responds to ‘Corvus’ by Emmy Verschoor, a mixed media work featuring a wolf silhouette against a background of…

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My review of Smashed Glass at Midnight by J V Birch

smashed-glass-at-midnight-cover-imageThis chapbook of twenty poems is published by Picaro Press, an imprint of Ginninderra Press. It is notable for its narrow shape, egg-shell-like cover paper and transparent endpaper. The poems are about loss in a number of contexts including failing relationships, childlessness, hospital admissions and dementia.

Each poem brings a distilled image with an intense focus where the abstract and the unseen often become embodied things. For example, in Sense of an ending – ‘The air between us is tired/wants to lie down/dream of doors being open’ and in What the old house thinks ‘my yellow’ is a living thing that once danced and sang and has now been stolen.

Emotions also become living entities, through the use of visual metaphor, that communicate with, possess, and control the speaker. In Offspring loss has its own will, taking the form of an unwanted companion, and ends up being carried in the speaker’s handbag and releasing itself as a ‘god-awful sound’. And in Instinct, ‘..it stood awkward at her door/ in a uniform it couldn’t breathe in.’

The poems also have the feel of a dreamlike distance as if the speaker is looking back on the past, detached from an earlier self where there was a sense of loss of control; where her body, hands and mouth had their own minds. From Admission – ‘her hands restless spiders make nests in her hair’ and she ‘moves her words to her fingers/ touches her mouth when she wants to speak’. Loss of control also features in Body where ‘many women have choices/mine are made for me.’

The image of the mouth punctuates these poems, recurring like an archetype where sounds and words are involuntarily released and then purposefully held-back. In Release, ‘I peel down/unravel myself./ Start with the flap at my mouth that’s teased for too long.’

Paper and folding also feature as metaphors for fragility and acceptance / closure. In Revelation ‘you thin me to paper’; in What the new wife does ‘she folds into routine’ and in Leaving ‘I place my goodbye on the table/ seven years of tears/ line dried, folded in pairs’.

This collection really resonated with me and its images stayed with me long after reading, a reflection of their strength and symbolism. I highly recommend it.

To end, here’s 17 years in full which I have chosen because of the stunning ‘moths that martyr the windows’.

17 years

Our mouths are no longer in love
they forget their place
what they used to be.

After rising I pair lonely hellos
spend the day elsewhere
although you left some time before this.

And still we return
to goodnights like moths that martyr the window
until we fold into ourselves.

J V Birch is a British poet living in Southern Australia. To buy the pamphlet, see Picaro Poets Series.

This review was originally published on Abegail Morley’s Poetry Shed.